bunnyfood:

Easter Outfits

1920s Dresses (via)

cwnerd12:

***flawless

When Mr. Thornton had left the house that morning he was almost blinded by his baffled passion. He was as dizzy as if Margaret, instead of looking, and speaking, and moving like a tender graceful woman, had been a sturdy fish-wife, and given him a sound blow with her fists. He had positive bodily pain, - a violent headache, and a throbbing intermittent pulse. He could not bear the noise, the garish light, the continued rumble and movement of the street. He called himself a fool for suffering so; and yet he could not, at the moment, recollect the cause of his suffering, and whether it was adequate to the consequences it had produced. It would have been a relief to him, if he could have sat down and cried on a door-step by a little child, who was raging and storming, through his passionate tears, at some injury he had received. He said to himself, that he hated Margaret, but a wild, sharp sensation of love cleft his dull, thunderous feeling like lightning, even as he shaped the words expressive of hatred. His greatest comfort was in hugging his torment; and in feeling, as he had indeed said to her, that though she might despise him, contemn him, treat him with her proud sovereign indifference, he did not change one whit. She could not make him change. He loved her, and would love her; and defy her, and this miserable bodily pain. 

amortentiafashion:

bathsabbath:

sutured-infection:

Silver skull vinaigrette, Europe, 1701-1900


Like pomanders, vinaigrettes could be used as a vessel to hold strong smelling substances to be sniffed should the user be passing through a particularly smelly area. At a time when miasma theories of disease – the idea that disease was carried by foul air – were dominant, carrying a vinaigrette was considered a protective measure. Vapours from a vinegar-soaked sponge in the bottom were inhaled through the small holes in the top of the ‘acorn’. If a person felt faint they could also sniff their vinaigrette and the sharp vinegar smell might shock their body into action. The other side of the vinaigrette shows a face and could act as a memento mori – a reminder of death. The skull was probably hung from a piece of cord or necklace and carried at all times.



I need to learn how to make these. Like, as soon as possible.

Walburga Black was determined to put on a strong front at all times, so she always carried an inhalable Revival Potion in a little skull-shaped vessel beneath her robes.

amortentiafashion:

bathsabbath:

sutured-infection:

Silver skull vinaigrette, Europe, 1701-1900

Like pomanders, vinaigrettes could be used as a vessel to hold strong smelling substances to be sniffed should the user be passing through a particularly smelly area. At a time when miasma theories of disease – the idea that disease was carried by foul air – were dominant, carrying a vinaigrette was considered a protective measure. Vapours from a vinegar-soaked sponge in the bottom were inhaled through the small holes in the top of the ‘acorn’. If a person felt faint they could also sniff their vinaigrette and the sharp vinegar smell might shock their body into action. The other side of the vinaigrette shows a face and could act as a memento mori – a reminder of death. The skull was probably hung from a piece of cord or necklace and carried at all times.

I need to learn how to make these. Like, as soon as possible.

Walburga Black was determined to put on a strong front at all times, so she always carried an inhalable Revival Potion in a little skull-shaped vessel beneath her robes.

geekdonnatroy:

thesovietspy:

howaboutadance:

marcrussometal:

cyalen:

a book fountain in Budapest

this is one of the coolest fountains I’ve ever seen

#You and I remember Budapest very differently. #That’s because you were too fascinated by the book fountain to notice anything else. #TASHA. IT WAS A FOUNTAIN THAT LOOKED LIKE A /BOOK./ #I know I was there— #BUT DO YOU REALLY KNOW?

#WHAT REALLY HAPPENED IN BUDAPEST.

missviolethunter:

Magnus hand porn. Happy Monday.

SHIT NO ONE TELLS YOU WHEN YOU START TO TUMBLE

idlesuperstar:

wolfwrecked:

  • Only the FIRST FIVE tags you use on a NEW POST show up in the tracked tags
  • Only the FIRST TWENTY tags on any post on your blog function (i.e click tag #21 and it will say page not found)
  • When you’re in your messages, you can click the top right corner of an ask & it will take you to a permalink page. Go to ‘edit’ (top right of page) and reply using the post edit screen (and add tags without an extension)
  • Always Reblog, Never Repost
  • Tumblr Etiquette: don’t delete the OPs caption, consider it part of the work as a whole.
  • Don’t tag your hate. If you don’t like a character or show or whatever, don’t tag your new post with their name/title/whatever in the first five tags. It shows up in the tracked tags. People that track a tag do so normally cause they love a thing. Don’t ruin a thing. No one likes a ruiner.
  • Tumblr default reblogs long text posts as links and its a pain in the ass. Who ever wants them as a link. No one, ever. When you’re reblogging a text post, go to the Aa drop down menu in the top right & select ‘reblog as text’. 
  • When you add a comment to a post, the OP sees it. Just so you know. There’s a whole etiquette on commenting vs tags but it’s your blog do what the fuck you want

This is excellent. I’d personally like to add: you don’t have to tag your reblogs as well as your OPs, but if you do, tumblr saviour/blacklist will pick up those tags and you will make your followers happy. 

One other brief comment re: the OP’s caption: if it identifies the material or has other explanatory information, I absolutely keep it. However, if it’s only a link back to their Tumblr or an extraneous comment like, “Cool!” I think it’s entirely permissible to delete it. I’m not here to publicize your Tumblr and it’s already easy for anyone to see from whence the post originated. As well, if I have some goofy story to go along with a photo, I don’t have any problem with someone just reblogging the post without my accompanying text. No harm, no foul.

twirlingavengers:

do you ever just sit around and think I’m in my twenties.

image

Sure, all the time. Then I remember I’m in my forties.

caseyyk:

wait, what? 

vivelareine:


A promotional photo of Anita Louise as the princesse de Lamballe in Marie Antoinette (1938)
[source: Live Auctioneers]

vivelareine:

A promotional photo of Anita Louise as the princesse de Lamballe in Marie Antoinette (1938)

[source: Live Auctioneers]